Creating a Router

The Router Class

When you're ready to start using your router, you'll need to create a new Router instance. The router instance is the core brains of TanStack Router and is responsible for managing the route tree, matching routes, and coordinating navigations and route transitions. It also serves as a place to configure router-wide settings.

tsx
import { createRouter } from '@tanstack/react-router'
const router = createRouter({
// ...
})

Route Tree

You'll probably notice quickly that the Router constructor requires a routeTree option. This is the route tree that the router will use to match routes and render components.

Whether you used file-based routing or code-based routing, you'll need to pass your route tree to the createRouter function:

Filesystem Route Tree

If you used our recommended file-based routing, then it's likely your generated route tree file was created at the default src/routeTree.gen.ts location. If you used a custom location, then you'll need to import your route tree from that location.

tsx
import { routeTree } from './routeTree.gen'

Code-Based Route Tree

If you used code-based routing, then you likely created your route tree manually using the root route's addChildren method:

tsx
const routeTree = rootRoute.addChildren([
// ...
])

Router Type Safety

⚠️ DO NOT SKIP THIS SECTION! ⚠️

TanStack Router provides amazing support for TypeScript, even for things you wouldn't expect like bare imports straight from the library! To make this possible, you must register your router's types using TypeScripts' Declaration Merging feature. This is done by extending the Register interface on @tanstack/react-router with a router property that has the type of your router instance:

tsx
declare module '@tanstack/react-router' {
interface Register {
// This infers the type of our router and registers it across your entire project
router: typeof router
}
}

With your router registered, you'll now get type-safety across your entire project for anything related to routing.

Not-Found Route

As promised in earlier guides, we'll now cover the notFoundRoute option. This option is used to configure a route that will render when no other suitable match is found. This is useful for rendering a 404 page or redirecting to a default route.

File-Based Routing

If you used file-based routing, then you'll need to import your root route from it's location and then use the notFoundRoute method to create a NotFoundRoute instance:

tsx
import { NotFoundRoute } from '@tanstack/react-router'
import { Route as rootRoute } from './routes/__root.tsx'
const notFoundRoute = new NotFoundRoute({
getParentRoute: () => rootRoute,
component: () => '404 Not Found',
})
const router = createRouter({
routeTree,
notFoundRoute,
})

Code-Based Routing

If You used code-based routing, then you'll need to create a NotFoundRoute with a reference to your root route, then pass it to your router's notFoundRoute option:

tsx
import { NotFoundRoute } from '@tanstack/react-router'
const rootRoute = createRootRoute()
// ...
const notFoundRoute = new NotFoundRoute({
getParentRoute: () => rootRoute,
component: () => '404 Not Found',
})
const router = createRouter({
routeTree,
notFoundRoute,
})

Other Options

There are many other options that can be passed to the Router constructor. You can find a full list of them in the API Reference.

Subscribe to Bytes

Your weekly dose of JavaScript news. Delivered every Monday to over 100,000 devs, for free.

Bytes

No spam. Unsubscribe at any time.

scarf analytics