File-Based Routes

Most of the TanStack Router documentation is written for file-based routing. This guide is mostly intended to help you understand in more detail how to configure file-based routing and the technical details behind how it works.

Prerequisites

To enable file-based route generation, you'll need to install either the @tanstack/router-vite-plugin or @tanstack/router-cli package to generate your route tree file.

Vite Plugin

The @tanstack/router-vite-plugin Vite plugin will automatically generate your route configuration through Vite's dev and build processes. It is the easiest way to use TanStack Router's route generation features.

sh
npm install @tanstack/router-vite-plugin

Vite Configuration

To enable the Vite plugin, add it to your vite.config.ts file:

tsx
// vite.config.ts
import { defineConfig } from 'vite'
import { TanStackRouterVite } from '@tanstack/router-vite-plugin'
// https://vitejs.dev/config/
export default defineConfig({
plugins: [
// ...,
TanStackRouterVite(),
],
})

With the plugin enabled, Vite will now watch your configured routesDirectory and generate your route tree whenever a file is added, removed, or changed.

Router CLI

If you are unable to use Vite, you can always use the Router CLI (which is what the Vite plugin uses) to generate your route configuration from your package dev/build scripts.

sh
npm install @tanstack/router-cli

With the CLI installed, the following commands are made available via the tsr command

generate

Generates the routes for a project based on the provided configuration.

Usage:

bash
tsr generate

watch

Continuously watches the specified directories and regenerates routes as needed.

Usage:

bash
tsr watch

Configuration

File-based routing comes with some sane defaults that should work for most projects:

bash
{
"routesDirectory": "./src/routes",
"generatedRouteTree": "./src/routeTree.gen.ts",
"routeFileIgnorePrefix": "-",
"quoteStyle": "single"
}

If these defaults work for your project, you don't need to configure anything at all! However, if you need to customize the configuration, you can do so by creating a tsr.config.json file in the root of your project directory.

  • Place the tsr.config.json file in the root of your project directory.

Options

The following options are available for configuration via the tsr.config.json file:

  • routeFilePrefix
    • (Optional) If set, only route files and directories that start with this string will be considered for routing.
  • routeFileIgnorePrefix
    • (Optional, Defaults to -) Route files and directories that start with this string will be ignored. By default this is set to - to allow for the use of directories to house related files that do not contain any route files.
  • routeFileIgnorePattern
    • (Optional) Ignore specific file and directories in the route directory. It can be used in regular expression format. For example .((css|const).ts)|test-page can ignore .css.ts and .const.ts file and ignore file and directories includes name with test-page
  • routesDirectory
    • (Required) The directory containing the routes relative to the cwd.
  • generatedRouteTree
    • (Required) The path to the file where the generated route tree will be saved, relative to the cwd.
  • quoteStyle
    • (Optional, Defaults to single) whether to use single or double quotes when formatting the generated route tree file.`
  • semicolons
    • (Optional, Defaults to false) whether to use semicolons in the generated route tree file.
  • disableTypes
    • (Optional, Defaults to false) whether to disable generating types for the route tree
    • If set to true, the generated route tree will not include any types.
    • If set to true and the generatedRouteTree file ends with .ts or .tsx, the generated route tree will be written as a .js file instead.
  • addExtensions
    • (Optional, Defaults to false) add file extensions to the route names in the generated route tree
  • disableLogging
    • (Optional, Defaults to false) disables logging for the route generation process

File Naming Conventions

File-based routing requires that you follow a few simple file naming conventions to ensure that your routes are generated correctly. The concepts these conventions enable are covered in detail in the Route Trees & Nesting guide.

  • __root.tsx
    • The root route file must be named __root.tsx and must be placed in the root of the configured routesDirectory.
  • . Separator
    • Routes can use the . character to denote a nested route. For example, blog.post will be generated as a child of blog.
  • $ Token
    • Routes segments with the $ token are parameterized and will extract the value from the URL pathname as a route param.
  • _ Prefix
    • Routes segments with the _ prefix are considered layout-routes and will not be used when matching its child routes against the URL pathname.
  • _ Suffix
    • Routes segments with the _ suffix exclude the route from being nested under any parent routes.
  • (folder) folder name pattern:
    • A folder that matches this pattern is treated as a route group which prevents this folder to be included in the route's URL path.
  • index Token
    • Routes segments ending with the index token (but before any file types) will be used to match the parent route when the URL pathname matches the parent route exactly.
  • .route.tsx File Type
    • When using directories to organize your routes, the route suffix can be used to create a route file at the directory's path. For example, blog.post.route.tsx or blog/post/route.tsx can be used at the route file for the /blog/post route.
  • .lazy.tsx File Type
    • The lazy suffix can be used to code-split components for a route. For example, blog.post.lazy.tsx will be used as the component for the blog.post route.
  • .component.tsx File Type (⚠️ deprecated)
  • .errorComponent.tsx File Type (⚠️ deprecated)
  • .pendingComponent.tsx File Type (⚠️ deprecated)
  • .loader.tsx File Type (⚠️ deprecated)
    • Each of these suffixes can be used to code-split components or loaders for a route. For example, blog.post.component.tsx will be used as the component for the blog.post route.
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